[OPE-L] The waning popularity of the teaching profession

From: Jerry Levy (Gerald_A_Levy@MSN.COM)
Date: Mon Oct 09 2006 - 17:50:36 EDT


Jurriaan thought that I would find the following story of interest.  I did:
what are the implications of this story for the next generation of the
global working class?    /  In solidarity, Jerry

5 October 2006 - The world will need 18 million new teachers in the coming
decade in order to meet demand worldwide for primary education, with
sub-Saharan Africa facing the greatest challenge, to boost its teacher force
by 68 per cent, United Nations officials said today. "There can be no viable
long-term solution to our education challenges and teacher shortages without
investment in training and measures to promote respect for the teaching
profession," said a statement, signed by UN agency heads, to mark World
Teachers Day.

 Already, nearly 100 million children are missing out on primary education -
mostly girls, many trapped in child labour - which will compound a current
accumulation of 800 million illiterate adults, representing 20 per cent of
the total adult population, added the statement. (...) Arab states, mainly
in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Morocco, will need to create 450,000 new
teaching posts during this period, while countries in South and West Asia
will need an additional 325,000 teachers, data collected by UNESCO showed.
(...) In Western Europe and the U.S. older teachers are retiring without
sufficient replacements, leading to an expected shortfall of 1.2 million
teachers in the same period, likely to be most acute in the U.S., Spain and
Ireland, UNESCO said.

 http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=20147&Cr=educat&Cr1
 Out of 100 adults of tertiary age, 69 are enrolled in tertiary education
programmes in North America and Europe, but only five are enrolled in
sub-Saharan Africa and 10 in South and West Asia.

 Six countries host 67% of the world's foreign or mobile students: with
23% studying in the United States, followed by the United Kingdom (12%),
Germany (11%), France (10%), Australia (7%) and Japan (5%).
http://www.uis.unesco.org/ev.php?ID=6513_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC
 The total number ("stock") of teachers in educational institutions in the
 world in  2004 is estimated at 26 million, of which 3.6 million in Western
Europe and  the USA.
http://www.uis.unesco.org/TEMPLATE/pdf/Teachers2006/TeachersReport.pdf


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